Events

Special Exhibition: Moundbuilders
You might be familiar with some of the more famous monuments around the globe—the Great Pyramids in Egypt; Stonehenge in England; Machu Picchu in Peru. But did you know we have our own impressive monuments right here in the United States? Some even older than the pyramids, these spectacular earthworks give us glimpses into more than 5,000 years of Native North American history. Moundbuilders explores the fascinating story of Native American moundbuilding through a variety of photographs, artifacts, archival materials, and excavation records.
August 1, 2017 9:00am to December 2, 2019 5:00pm
Penn Museum
34th Annual Latinx Heritage Month
Join us for a monthlong series of events celebrating the 34th annual Latinx Heritage Month at Penn.
September 5, 2019 12:00pm to October 4, 2019 12:00pm
Various
Hostile Terrain 94 Pop-up Exhibition Hosted by Penn Museum
A global participatory political art project that memorializes and bears witness to the thousands of migrants who have died as a result of Prevention Through Deterrence, the U.S. immigration policy between Mexico and the United States. The project is sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project, a non-profit research-art-education-media collective directed by Jason De León, Professor of Anthropology and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA. The pop-up installation is a 20-foot long map of the Arizona/Mexico border populated with approximately 3200 handwritten toe tags containing information about those who have died while migrating.
September 25, 2019 10:00am to September 27, 2019 5:00pm
Penn Museum, 3260 South Street
Nikole Hannah-Jones Lecture
Nikole Hannah-Jones, an award-winning journalist who writes about civil rights and racial injustice for the New York Times Magazine, will be discussing the ongoing segregation in public education at the biennial Steven S. Goldberg and Jolley Bruce Christman Lecture in Education Law. Her talk is entitled Why Integration Matters: The Ongoing Segregation of Schools in the 21st Century. Following her remarks, she will be joined by Dr. Rand Quinn, Associate Professor of Education, for continued dialogue. 
September 25, 2019 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Penn Law, Michael A. Fitts Auditorium 3501 Sansom Street
“Work Is Work” Kinship, Race, and Violence on the Human Smuggling Trail
A talk by Jason de León, Professor of Anthropology and Chicana/o Studies, the University of California, Los Angeles.  Transnational gangs such as the notorious MS-13 have recently become directly involved in the human smuggling economy in Latin America. Award-winning anthropologist Jason De León is renowned for his field studies on how clandestine migration has become a complicated, often violent social relationship between smugglers and their clients. His latest work follows the daily lives of Honduran gang members in Mexico whose notions of kinship, race, and gender are crucial for understanding how smuggling systems adapt to changes in U.S. immigration security strategies, and for making sense of the seemingly senseless violence that people find themselves in.
September 25, 2019 5:00pm
Lightbox Film Center, 3701 Chestnut Street
“Work Is Work”: Kinship, Race, and Violence on the Human Smuggling Trail
A talk and film screening by Jason de León, Professor of Anthropology and Chicana/o Studies, the University of California, Los Angeles. Transnational gangs such as the notorious MS-13 have recently become directly involved in the human smuggling economy in Latin America. Award-winning anthropologist Jason De León is renowned for his field studies on how clandestine migration has become a complicated, often violent social relationship between smugglers and their clients. His latest work follows the daily lives of Honduran gang members in Mexico whose notions of kinship, race, and gender are crucial for understanding how smuggling systems adapt to changes in U.S. immigration security strategies, and for making sense of the seemingly senseless violence that people find themselves in.
September 25, 2019 5:00pm to 9:00pm
Lightbox Film Center, 3701 Chestnut Street
Geographical Bias in Standardized Testing: Is Cultural and Socioeconomic Bias a Problem of the Past or Are We Simply Not Looking in the Right Space?
A talk by Manuel S. González Canché, Associate Professor, Penn GSE.
September 27, 2019 12:00pm
Sociology Conference Room, McNeil 367
Screening & Facilitated Discussion of the Movie, The Hate U Give
The Hate U Give, a movie based on a novel by Angie Thomas, follows the fallout after a high school student witnesses a police shooting and struggles navigating between two worlds.  Faciliatated by Dr. Ann Tiao and Imani Harvin.
September 27, 2019 5:00pm
Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall
Tijaniyya in the History of Niumi (Gambia): Reflections on Jihad and Conversion
Assan Sarr is an associate professor of History and the director of graduate studies in the Department of History at Ohio University. I am also an affiliate faculty of the African Studies Program and a member of the Ohio University Press Board. In 2016, I was awarded the 2016-17 Jeanette G. Grasselli Brown Faculty Teaching Award in the Humanities. Prior to joining the Ohio University faculty, I taught African and World History at the College of Charleston in South Carolina for 3 years. My research interests covers a wide range of topics including agrarian change, land tenure and Islam in Gambia region.  I published several articles, book chapters and a 2016 book entitled Islam Power and Dependency in the Gambia River Basin: The politics of land control, 1790-1940 with the University of Rochester Press. I am now working on a book on a Tijaniyya community in the Gambia, whose role in the growth and development of the brotherhood in the Senegambia was major but not recognized in the scholarship.
October 3, 2019 5:00pm
3401 Walnut Street, 330A
Penn Spectrum Weekend
Penn Spectrum Weekend (PSW) is a weekend-long conference and celebration taking place on Penn’s Campus on October 4-6, 2019. The conference is hosted every three years and brings together alumni for dialogue centered on issues of cultural identity and the intersectionalities that may play a role, including topics specific to the Black, Latinx, Native, Asian, LGBTQ, Muslim, First-gen alumni and student communities. We welcome and invite alumni and allies from all backgrounds as well as all current Penn undergraduate and graduate students.
October 4, 2019 8:30am to October 6, 2019 7:30pm
Various campus locations

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