Events

Deaf Home Movies
The Penn Museum presents the Second Sunday Culture Films using raw footage of real events, places, and things that reveal important aspects of the social and material world. Even without any speaking, home movies made by Deaf families are full of complex and intimate communication. Two leading scholars of ASL literature, Matt Malzkuhn and Ted Supalla, will present a range of these rarely screened films for the first time in Philadelphia. Presented in ASL with voiceinterpretation.  Film to be followed by conversation.
February 10, 2019 2:00pm
Rainey Auditorium, Penn Museum, 3260 South Street
The Gabriel of Madness: Urdu Poetry and Ethical Life in Contemporary India
South Asia Studies 2018-2019 Colloquium presents Anand Taneja, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, Islamic Traditions of South Asia Vanderbilt University, speaking on The Gabriel of Madness: Urdu Poetry and Ethical Life in Contemporary India.
February 13, 2019 2:15pm
Van Pelt Library, Class of '55 Room
Terra Femme: Women and the Travelogue Archives
The Penn Museum's Second Sunday Culture Films use raw footage of real events, places, and things that reveal important aspects of the social and material world. LA-based filmmaker Courtney Stephens will share selections from the archives of early 20th-century travelogue film and talk about the women who traversed the globe to capture this amazing footage. Reception to follow.  Film to be followed by conversation.
March 10, 2019 2:00pm
Rainey Auditorium, Penn Museum, 3260 South Street
Tectonic Shifts in the Histories of Yoga and Ayurveda
South Asia Studies 2018-2019 Colloquium presents Dominik Wujastyk, Professor & Singhmar Chair in Classical Indian Society and Polity Arts History and Classics University of Alberta, speaking on Tectonic Shifts in the Histories of Yoga and Ayurveda.
March 13, 2019 4:30pm
Van Pelt Library, Class of '55 Room
Cave 10, Ellora: Excavating an Artisanal History of Vishwakarma
South Asia Studies 2018-2019 Colloquium presents Ken George and Kirin Narayan, Australian National University, speaking on Cave 10, Ellora: Excavating an Artisanal History of Vishwakarma.
March 20, 2019 4:30pm
Van Pelt Library, Class of '55 Room
B.R. Ambedkar and the 'Prostitute Problem' in Modern Maharashtra
South Asia Studies 2018-2019 Colloquium presents Shailaja Paik, University of Cincinnati, speaking on B.R. Ambedkar and the 'Prostitute Problem' in Modern Maharashtra.
March 27, 2019 4:30pm
Van Pelt Library, Class of '55 Room
Queer Urgencies Conference
Presented by the Gen/Sex Reading Group In a moment when the legal recognition of gay and lesbian subjects in the United States coincides with the increased precarity of queer and/or raced bodies globally, this conference queries the possibilities and provocations of queer politics. By putting the term "urgent" next to the term "queer," we hope to ask not only what's urgent about queer studies now, but also what urges, emergencies, and insurgencies queer studies—with its specific critical methods and resources—should prioritize.
April 5, 2019 9:00am to April 6, 2019 5:00pm
Penn Campus
Monuments and Memory
David Brownlee, Frances Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of 19th-Century European Art, University of Pennsylvania and Ken Lum, Artist and Professor of Fine Arts, Univeristy of Pennsylvania The role of monuments and their representation of the past as it extends to the present has recently become a site of discussion, engagement, and conflict. Now that Philadelphia has become the first UNESCO World Heritage city, the meaning of monuments—to make, reflect, frame, and hide our city, its history, and its diversity—has become all the more important. How might we reimagine the monument to be more inclusive, more representative, and more meaningful to us all?
April 17, 2019 5:00pm
Widener Auditorium, Penn Museum, 3260 South Street
Gothic States Conference
Presented by Penn English and the Center for Italian Studies This conference asks scholars to consider the Gothic's function across differing "states"—as a language both for addressing incipient nationalisms, and for representing divided consciousness, whether sexual, political, filial, or religious. The most powerful Gothic texts, in fact, place these concerns in dialogue with one another, depicting individuals and communities under duress in times of upheaval. Plenary speakers will be Maurizio Ascari (University of Bologna), Robin Furth (Marvel Comics), Diego Saglia (University of Parma), and Angela Wright (University of Sheffield).
April 19, 2019 9:00am to April 21, 2019 5:00pm
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center